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Palaeontology segment

In each episode, Scott Sampson cuts in three times each and discusses three different topics.

In each episode of Dinosaur Planet, various palaeontology segments occur, discussing various fossil findings, dinosaur behaviour, and catastrophic events that occurred during the Mesozoic Era. Hosted by Discovery Quest palaeontologist Scott Sampson at the Utah Museum of Natural History, these segments occur three times per episode, and give a fascinating look on the world of dinosaurs. Each episode, three different topics are discussed, and are given proof or explanation to back up the claims; however, few cases are ever officially proven in the world of palaeontology.

"White Tip's Journey"Edit

The real VelociraptorEdit

Scott Sampson - Velociraptor (Dinosaur Planet White Tip's Journey)

Scott Sampson - Velociraptor (Dinosaur Planet White Tip's Journey)

We still don't know why feathers evolved, but we do know, if it looks like a bird, and acts like a bird, it must be a dinosaur.
— Scott Sampson

Info to be added

Notes:

  • Stock footage of the Zuni Basin dromaeosaur from Discovery's earlier 2001 documentary When Dinosaurs Roamed America is shown.
  • A Carnotaurus skull can be seen in the background, a species that never appeared in the series.

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Prehistoric Mongolia predators, OviraptorEdit

Scott Sampson - Oviraptor (Dinosaur Planet White Tip's Journey)

Scott Sampson - Oviraptor (Dinosaur Planet White Tip's Journey)

When it comes to dinosaur behavior, we usually have to rely on our best guess. And those ideas will change, as we make new discoveries.
— Scott Sampson, "White Tip's Journey"

Info to be added

Notes:

  • Scott Sampson appears to be holding an Oviraptor skull; however, it is actually the holotype skull of Anzu, a dinosaur which was not named until over a decade after the release of Dinosaur Planet.
  • The Carnotaurus skull is visible once again.

GalleryEdit

Fighting Dinosaurs FossilEdit

Scott Sampson - Fighting Dinosaurs Fossil (Dinosaur Planet White Tip's Journey)

Scott Sampson - Fighting Dinosaurs Fossil (Dinosaur Planet White Tip's Journey)

Then, like a California mudslide, the entire top layer gave way, and in an instant predator and prey were buried beneath tonnes of sand. A fossil freezeframe - captured, in time.
— Scott Sampson, "White Tip's Journey"

Info to be added

Notes:

  • The episode ends on this segment.

GalleryEdit

"Pod's Travels"Edit

Dinosaur migration and Land BridgesEdit

It seems improbable, but with enough time - say, millions of years, the odds of even the unlikely occuring, become almost a certainty.
— Scott Sampson, "Pod's Travels"

Info to be added

Notes:

  • The Carnotaurus skull can be seen again.

GalleryEdit

Dwarf dinosaursEdit

Whether mammals, or dinosaurs, large-bodied animals marooned on islands tend to downsize over time. Why? Probably several factors, including limited food supply. Whatever the reason, these dwarf species show that big things - really can come - in small packages.
— Scott Sampson, "Pod's Travels"

Info to be added

Notes:

  • Another Carnotaurus skull makes a second and more obvious cameo, making it the only species in the whole show to appear in two episodes.

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Assumptions on Pyroraptor anatomyEdit

In my line of detective work, new clues are always turning up, and few cases are ever truly closed.
— Scott Sampson, "Pod's Travels"

Info to be added

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"Little Das' Hunt"Edit

TyrannosaurusEdit

Some scientists argue that mass graveyards of dinosaur predators, found in places like Canada, and Argentina, support the case for group living. But, the burials only show that they died in the same place. Doesn't mean they lived, or even hunted, together. Like some large carnivores today, tyrannosaurs may have been solitary hunters. The jury is still out.
— Scott Sampson, "Little Das' Hunt"

Info to be added

Notes:

  • Stock footage of the T. rex from Discovery's earlier 2001 documentaries; When Dinosaurs Roamed America and Valley of the T-Rex, are shown. The distorted elephant trumpet roar is heard in the stock footage of both programs due to the episode having T. rex’s cousin Daspletosaurus using the sound effect.
    • The T. rex model in Valley of the T-Rex can also be spotted on one of the Macintosh computers.

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Einiosaurus' nose hornEdit

Like so much of life, it all comes down to sex.
— Scott Sampson, "Little Das' Hunt"

Info to be added

Notes:

  • The Carnotaurus skull from "White Tip's Journey can be seen again.
  • Uses Triceratops footage from When Dinosaurs Roamed America.

GalleryEdit

Elkhorn eruptionEdit

We witnessed the same kind of devastation in 1980, when Mount St. Helens erupted. Yet the Elkhorn eruption ranks as one of the most powerful ever recorded. By comparison, Mount St. Helens - was merely a firecracker.
— Scott Sampson, "Little Das' Hunt"

Info to be added

Notes:

  • The holotype skull of Anzu can be seen far in the background.
  • Uses Mount Saint Helens eruption footage.
  • The episode ends on this segment.

GalleryEdit

"Alpha's Egg"Edit

Saltasaur egg layingEdit

Whatever the case, something as simple as laying an egg, still mystifies us. And what really amazes me is that one of the largest creatures ever to walk the Earth, hatched from an egg - a little larger, than a grapefruit.
— Scott Sampson, "Alpha's Egg"

Info to be added

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Survival of juvenile sauropodsEdit

A saltasaur could have reached its adult size of 35 feet long, in under twelve years. At that rate, by the time a human child entered kindergarten, it would be 15 feel tall. For saltasaurs, survival meant growing up fast.
— Scott Sampson, "Alpha's Egg"

Info to be added

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Plains floodEdit

A disaster for the saltasaurs proved a boom for palaeontologists. In death, these creatures give us an extraordinary glimpse, into their lives.
— Scott Sampson, "Alpha's Egg"

Info to be added

GalleryEdit

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